Computational Lithography: Illuminating the Future of Semiconductor Manufacturing

Tech behind computational lithography has revolutionised the way semiconductors are fabricated. By harnessing the power of computer algorithms and simulations, chip designs have become more efficient and powerful than ever before. Its ability to optimize lithographic processes have given a huge boost to the overall performance and energy efficiency of electronic devices. As we move forward, computational lithography is expected to merge with other technologies and re-shape the future where technology knows no bounds.

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Interview: Dr. Andy Wang, a Bioelectronics Scientist at the University of Cambridge, England

Meet Dr. Andy Wang, PhD, a leading researcher in the Biointerface Group at the University of Cambridge, under the esteemed Prof. Shery Huang. Dr. Wang brings a wealth of expertise to the field, having earned a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the prestigious Tsinghua University in 2016, followed by a PhD in the same field from the world-renowned Cambridge University Engineering Department in 2021.

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Planetary Puzzle: Aquodiium Ions may Influence Uranus and Neptune’s Magnetic Fields

Scientists from Skoltech and their Chinese colleagues have discovered conditions that might allow for the existence of a unique ion called aquodiium. This ion is essentially a water molecule that has gained two extra protons. This means, the “regular” H₂O formula with two additional protons (H⁺), will make its chemical formula H₅O²⁺.

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Electronic Spider Silk: A Versatile Solution for Bioelectronics

Super-thin and flexible electronics are here to stay. This tech will not only create but it will also revolutionize the use of gadgets. Since, it leads to unlimited possibilities for innovative and practical applications. Some of the them include but not limited to – wearable tech, portability, healthcare applications, space probes etc.

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Interview: Dr. Laura E. Newman, a Cell Biologist at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, US

Meet Dr. Laura E. Newman, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Cell Biology at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, United States. Her research delves into the intriguing role of mitochondria—these tiny powerhouses that were once ancient bacteria now living inside our cells—as crucial regulators of cellular signaling.

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Nanoparticles Break Blood-Brain Barrier for Cancer Treatment: Targeting Metabolic Adaptability

Scientists at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have crafted a tiny particle capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier. The team envision to tackle both primary breast cancer tumors and brain metastases in a single treatment. Their investigations indicate that this approach can reduce the size of both breast and brain tumors in lab experiments.

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Book Review: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

“Fahrenheit 451” is a dystopian fiction, written by American author Ray Bradbury in 1953. It stands as one of his most acclaimed works, delving into a dystopian world where people are programmed for efficiency and superficial contentment through constant exposure to television. In this society, intellectuals and free thinkers are absent, and replaced by passive TV viewers. The Plot: Guy Montag’s Evolution The narrative unfolds through the eyes of Gus Montag, a member of the fire brigade. Also, the central character, Guy Montag, is tasked with identifying and incinerating forbidden…

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Book Review: Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

Klara and the Sun is my second read from the vault of Kazuo Ishiguro. The book was first published in 2021. It is a dystopian science fiction novel set in a future where android companions are designed for children. In this era, wealthy parents can choose to enhance their children’s intelligence through a process known as “lifting,” which likely involves genetic engineering, although the specifics are not fully explained in the book. While “lifting” boosts intelligence, it also carries risks such as chronic illness and even mortality.

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