Computational Lithography: Illuminating the Future of Semiconductor Manufacturing

Tech behind computational lithography has revolutionised the way semiconductors are fabricated. By harnessing the power of computer algorithms and simulations, chip designs have become more efficient and powerful than ever before. Its ability to optimize lithographic processes have given a huge boost to the overall performance and energy efficiency of electronic devices. As we move forward, computational lithography is expected to merge with other technologies and re-shape the future where technology knows no bounds.

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Interview: Dr. Laura E. Newman, a Cell Biologist at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, US

Meet Dr. Laura E. Newman, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Cell Biology at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, United States. Her research delves into the intriguing role of mitochondria—these tiny powerhouses that were once ancient bacteria now living inside our cells—as crucial regulators of cellular signaling.

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Book Review: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

“Fahrenheit 451” is a dystopian fiction, written by American author Ray Bradbury in 1953. It stands as one of his most acclaimed works, delving into a dystopian world where people are programmed for efficiency and superficial contentment through constant exposure to television. In this society, intellectuals and free thinkers are absent, and replaced by passive TV viewers. The Plot: Guy Montag’s Evolution The narrative unfolds through the eyes of Gus Montag, a member of the fire brigade. Also, the central character, Guy Montag, is tasked with identifying and incinerating forbidden…

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Book Review: Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

Klara and the Sun is my second read from the vault of Kazuo Ishiguro. The book was first published in 2021. It is a dystopian science fiction novel set in a future where android companions are designed for children. In this era, wealthy parents can choose to enhance their children’s intelligence through a process known as “lifting,” which likely involves genetic engineering, although the specifics are not fully explained in the book. While “lifting” boosts intelligence, it also carries risks such as chronic illness and even mortality.

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Book Review: The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood

“The Blind Assassin” is a book authored by Canadian writer Margaret Atwood, initially published in 2000. This marks my second time reading the same book, yet I still don’t feel adequately prepared to provide a review. This book is intricately and elegantly crafted. As we delve into its pages, we gain deep insights into the characters, yet there’s a veil of uncertainty about whose perspective we’re truly witnessing. I felt myself compelled to hunt for subtle clues sprinkled throughout the book, determined to unravel the mysteries concealed within its pages.

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Interview: Dr. Shoji Takeuchi, a Biohybrid Systems Scientist at The University of Tokyo, Japan

Welcome to our chat with Dr. Shoji Takeuchi, a Biohybrid Systems Scientist rocking it at The University of Tokyo. Dr. Takeuchi’s research covers a bunch of cool stuff like Biohybrid Systems, MEMS, Microfluidics, Tissue Engineering, and Artificial Cell Membrane. Basically, he’s all about blending biology and tech to create awesome bio-hybrid systems.

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Book Review: The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky

When I seek literature that is intricate and profound, I turn to the works of Dostoevsky. And this time, I picked up, “The Brothers Karamazov”. Dostoevsky dedicated almost two years to crafting “The Brothers Karamazov,” serialized in The Russian Messenger from January 1879 to November 1880. Sadly, he passed away less than four months after its publication. This masterpiece has since been hailed as one of the paramount accomplishments in world literature.

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Interview: Dr. Yuanbo Chen, Quantum Information Scientist at The University of Tokyo, Japan

Meet Dr. Yuanbo Chen, a dynamic and dedicated PhD student at The University of Tokyo. He is an invaluable member of the Hasegawa Group, where his intellectual curiosity and commitment to pushing the boundaries of quantum research shine brightly. In a recent scientific breakthrough, Dr. Chen, in collaboration with his accomplished team has captured headlines with their pioneering research in battery technology.

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mtDNA: Key Component of Energy Production and Trigger of Inflammation

Entity responsible for powering our cellular functions and in keeping us going is mitochondria. These powerhouses are little sausage-shaped organelles in most types of cells that have a nucleus. These organelles convert chemical energy from the food that we ingest into usable form of energy. This energy is termed as adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is the fuel that we require to carry out the regular activities at cellular level.

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Book Review: The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells

Having read “The War of the Worlds” when I was younger, this time around, it was a quick read for me. Additionally, having seen the movie, the pace felt familiar and flowed well. The book written by H. G. Wells was first published in 1898. I am still completely in awe of the creativity that Wells showcased during that era. I’m certain this book was ahead of its time. Anyone considering writing a sci-fi story should first study Wells’ work.

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Analyzing Pulsars: To Detect Subnanohertz Gravitational Waves

Detecting gravitational waves have always been a challenging task. It is caused due to high energetic events, like colliding black holes or neutron stars. And so, the phenomenon is like ripples on the fabric of space-time. By the time, this effect reaches us (from deep space), the signals become extremely weak. And hence, too faint to detect.   

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