Electronic Spider Silk: A Versatile Solution for Bioelectronics

Super-thin and flexible electronics are here to stay. This tech will not only create but it will also revolutionize the use of gadgets. Since, it leads to unlimited possibilities for innovative and practical applications. Some of the them include but not limited to – wearable tech, portability, healthcare applications, space probes etc.

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Interview: Dr. Laura E. Newman, a Cell Biologist at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, US

Meet Dr. Laura E. Newman, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Cell Biology at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, United States. Her research delves into the intriguing role of mitochondria—these tiny powerhouses that were once ancient bacteria now living inside our cells—as crucial regulators of cellular signaling.

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Nanoparticles Break Blood-Brain Barrier for Cancer Treatment: Targeting Metabolic Adaptability

Scientists at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have crafted a tiny particle capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier. The team envision to tackle both primary breast cancer tumors and brain metastases in a single treatment. Their investigations indicate that this approach can reduce the size of both breast and brain tumors in lab experiments.

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Book Review: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

“Fahrenheit 451” is a dystopian fiction, written by American author Ray Bradbury in 1953. It stands as one of his most acclaimed works, delving into a dystopian world where people are programmed for efficiency and superficial contentment through constant exposure to television. In this society, intellectuals and free thinkers are absent, and replaced by passive TV viewers. The Plot: Guy Montag’s Evolution The narrative unfolds through the eyes of Gus Montag, a member of the fire brigade. Also, the central character, Guy Montag, is tasked with identifying and incinerating forbidden…

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Book Review: Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

Klara and the Sun is my second read from the vault of Kazuo Ishiguro. The book was first published in 2021. It is a dystopian science fiction novel set in a future where android companions are designed for children. In this era, wealthy parents can choose to enhance their children’s intelligence through a process known as “lifting,” which likely involves genetic engineering, although the specifics are not fully explained in the book. While “lifting” boosts intelligence, it also carries risks such as chronic illness and even mortality.

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Book Review: The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood

“The Blind Assassin” is a book authored by Canadian writer Margaret Atwood, initially published in 2000. This marks my second time reading the same book, yet I still don’t feel adequately prepared to provide a review. This book is intricately and elegantly crafted. As we delve into its pages, we gain deep insights into the characters, yet there’s a veil of uncertainty about whose perspective we’re truly witnessing. I felt myself compelled to hunt for subtle clues sprinkled throughout the book, determined to unravel the mysteries concealed within its pages.

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Interview: Dr. Shoji Takeuchi, a Biohybrid Systems Scientist at The University of Tokyo, Japan

Welcome to our chat with Dr. Shoji Takeuchi, a Biohybrid Systems Scientist rocking it at The University of Tokyo. Dr. Takeuchi’s research covers a bunch of cool stuff like Biohybrid Systems, MEMS, Microfluidics, Tissue Engineering, and Artificial Cell Membrane. Basically, he’s all about blending biology and tech to create awesome bio-hybrid systems.

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Book Review: The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky

When I seek literature that is intricate and profound, I turn to the works of Dostoevsky. And this time, I picked up, “The Brothers Karamazov”. Dostoevsky dedicated almost two years to crafting “The Brothers Karamazov,” serialized in The Russian Messenger from January 1879 to November 1880. Sadly, he passed away less than four months after its publication. This masterpiece has since been hailed as one of the paramount accomplishments in world literature.

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