Book Review: Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut

Kurt Vonnegut’s mind was a treasure trove of compelling and thought-provoking ideas, woven into narratives that challenged conventions, provoked introspection, and sparked conversation. His ability to engage readers on multiple levels – whether through his biting satire, profound insights, or dark humor – is both rewarding and intellectually stimulating. His books possess a timeless quality that resonates with readers across generations. And often reveal new layers of meaning upon each re-reading. Every time I dive into one of Kurt Vonnegut’s books, I can’t help but feel that whichever one I’m…

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Book Review: Stephen Hawking by Michael White & John Gribbin

Michael White and Dr John Gribbin, adept science writers, have masterfully depicted an indomitable genius and an expansive scientific intellect in the book – Stephen Hawking: A Life in Science. It was first published in 1992. As I read the pages of this book, I’m struck by how the writers effortlessly blend clear explanations of Hawking’s scientific achievements with a heartfelt account of his personal life. Their approach allows readers like me to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for both facets of his remarkable journey. The book recounts how…

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Book Review: Blindness by José Saramago

“Blindness” is written by José Saramago. It was first published in 1995. The author is widely regarded as one of Portugal’s greatest literary figures, and his novel “Blindness” stands as a testament to his talent and artistic vision. The book is not written in traditional punctuation and paragraph structures; may be because the writer intended to cultivate a stream of voices that mirror the concept of blindness in its multifaceted manifestations.

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Book Review: Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut

Writers, let me be more specific, science fiction writers are visionaries. Pick up any sci-fi classic, isn’t the themes and repercussions hint at some kind of inevitability? Every science fiction novel that I have read so far has given us a peek into the future and help us understand where our current choices might lead us. Within this genre, themes and repercussions often serve as cautionary tales or reflections of contemporary societal issues. For me, Kurt Vonnegut is one of the names that fall into the category of absolute literary…

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Book Review: Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

Lately, I’ve been exploring the dystopian genre, relying on recommendations from Goodreads since I’m not very familiar with it. “Never Let Me Go” by Kazuo Ishiguro is my first foray into his work, and it’s a masterpiece of literary fiction. Interestingly, it also evokes comparisons to my favorite author, Margaret Atwood and Lois Lowry. I’ll delve into that connection shortly, but first, let me share my thoughts on this captivating novel. “Never Let Me Go” is an interesting science fiction novel written by British author Kazuo Ishiguro, published in 2005.…

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Book Review: The Brilliant Abyss by Dr. Helen Scales

“The Brilliant Abyss: Exploring the Majestic Hidden Life of the Deep Ocean and the Looming Threat that Imperils It” is an awesome work by Dr. Helen Scales. The book was first published in 2021. Dr. Scales is a distinguished marine biologist, accomplished writer, and captivating broadcaster. With an impressive repertoire of books exploring the wonders of the ocean, including the Guardian bestseller “Spirals in Time” and the New York Times top summer read “The Brilliant Abyss,” Dr. Scales has established herself as a leading voice in marine literature.

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Book Review: Twilight of Idols and Anti-Christ by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche’s ” Twilight of Idols and Anti-Christ” sharply criticizes the dominant values, institutions, and beliefs of his era. Accordingly, this bold work encourages readers to challenge their own assumptions and fearlessly explore long-accepted traditional ideas. “Twilight of the Idols” was penned in 1888, while “The Anti-Christ”, was composed shortly after in the same year. And Nietzsche’s mental breakdown occurred in early January 1889, just a short time after completing these works.

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Book Review: The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky

In this fascinating literary journey, Dostoevsky takes a deep dive into the complex world of human nature and psychology. Initially released in serialized form, “The Idiot” made its debut in The Russian Messenger during 1868–69. In my opinion, Dostoevsky’s firsthand experiences with corruption, imprisonment, and solitude permeate in nearly all his main characters. The protagonist in the “The Idiot” comes back to his “old city” but he is taken aback as he steps into the refurbished glittering scene of Russian high society. Things here are definitely not what they seem…

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Book Review: The Castle by Franz Kafka

Published in Germany in 1926, Franz Kafka’s “The Castle” (Das Schloss) faced challenges after the author’s death in 1924. Despite Kafka’s wish that his books not be published, his friend Max Brod disregarded this. Initially, “The Castle” struggled with poor sales, and Nazi efforts to ban works by German Jews, including Kafka, limited its availability. Schocken Verlag, a Jewish publisher, was allowed to continue publishing Jewish works under the condition that they were exclusively sold to Jews. Today, Kafka is esteemed as one of the prominent figures in 20th-century literature,…

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Book Review: Childhood’s End by Arthur C. Clarke

“Childhood’s End” by Arthur C. Clarke is rich in imaginative concepts and in exploration of profound philosophical and existential questions. Highly recommended by a friend, I couldn’t resist picking up this book last week. Interestingly, I initially contemplated making “2001: A Space Odyssey” my first venture into Clarke’s literary repertoire. Having completed “Childhood’s End,” I am convinced that my decision to start with this novel was a wise one.

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Book Review: Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

This was my third Vonnegut novel after Timequake and 2BR02B. The book has the similar approach at satirical jab at the tough parts of life that often get overlooked. However, I feel it has a touch of sci-fi also with elements such as time travel and aliens. Slaughterhouse-Five, is also called, The Children’s Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death was first published in 1969. In the book, Kurt Vonnegut takes a real close look at the whole anti-war scene. He’s picking up on Nietzsche’s anti-morality vibes. For instance, Vonnegut explores the…

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Book Review: Animal Farm by George Orwell

I eventually decided to read this book that I’d been avoiding for quite some time, and believe me, it turned out to be really enjoyable. The book was first published in 1945 in England. George Orwell, under the real name Eric Blair, faced publisher reluctance to release “Animal Farm” due to its daring satire of the Russian Revolution and the rise of communism. While not explicitly mentioned, political connections are evident as we read the book.

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