Digging Adaptations Facilitated Shell in Turtles: Study on Eunotosaurusafricanus

Turtle shell, conventionally, is considered an outer covering for protection and lodging for the animal. Till date, turtle is the only living vertebrate with such a sturdy broad ribbed proto shell. However, recent study of fossil turtles, which happen to be around 260- million-year-old, has revealed that the hard and rigid protective structure of the animal is not adapted for protection rather for digging underground. Dr. Lyson, the scientist behind this discovery said that during the early (evolutionary) phase, birds’ feathers too were not employed for flying. Nevertheless, birds starting…

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Advanced sense of odor helps ants identify individual ants: Nestmate versus Non-nestmate

Scientists studying ants have always wondered how ants living in huge colonies, identify other ants belong to same colony or is an intruder or enemy ant. Researchers from The University of California, Riverside have found an answer to this question. They have found that ants communicate via diverse hydrocarbon chemicals present on the their outer shells (or cuticles). 

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Green Future: PlasticRoads an Alternative to Tar and Asphalt road surfaces

Experts worldwide keep finding new ways to recycle plastic waste. Qualities like lightweight, moisture resistant, flexible and relatively cheap have increased production and consumption of plastic worldwide, but with so many benefits, comes disadvantages. Plastics do not decompose easily and are posing serious threat for the environment. From land to sea, everywhere plastic debris can be seen and is a major concern for the environmentalist.  

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Bees prefer Pesticides ridden Nectar: Insect Pollinators

Pesticides are used across the world to kill pests that cause damage to the food that would be consumed by humans. This implies that the effect of pesticides should repel insects but in some cases, it is not so. Researchers at Newcastle University and Trinity College Dublin have discovered that certain species of bees are fascinated towards nectars that contain pesticides in them. Neonicotinoid-laced food chosen by bees Prior studies have proposed that bees would have to face negative consequences in terms of health in case the specie is exposed…

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Climate change catalyzes appearance of Infectious Diseases: War against emerging Epidemic

Rise in the global temperature is going to promote the outbreak of deadly infectious diseases as Ebola and West Nile virus in new hosts and in new areas. Researchers caution humans to anticipate the breakout of new illnesses, in near future due to rapid changes in the climate that forces habitats to shift and thus bringing pathogens in contact with livestock, crops, humans and wildlife. 

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Parasitic Wasp stings Virus to control Ladybug’s Mind: Bio-Weapon turns them into Zombie

Life of animals, either big or small is not easy. Those with the most advanced skill can only survive in the nature. Our nature is full of such examples where for the survival, some animals resolves to take up sexual cannibalism while other uses virus to control the mind of their host organism. Such animals that derive benefits at the expense of other animals are termed as parasites. 

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PET Plastic Bottles morph to Paper: Ecological Paper

A Mexican startup company, Cronology situated in Ecatepec, has designed an innovative environment friendly technology that recycles waste PET bottles into peta paper or mineral paper. The technology claims to conserve around 20 trees from being chopped down and 50,000 liter of precious water on the production of per ton of paper, as they do not need chlorine or water for manufacturing. 

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Coin Spiders Self-Emasculate after Mating: Survival of the Genes

Much has been discussed about the cruel phenomenon of sexual cannibalism practiced by the famous black widow spider but not many know about another crazy phenomenon practiced by a male coin spider. These male spiders (Herennia multipuncta) are one of the greatest lovers in the nature. These tiny spiders have the courage to propose a female almost four times its size, which, if hungry rejects the proposal and preferably feeds on the male. However, scientists observed that if the male is lucky enough to woo the female, the male after mating…

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Evolution of Stripes in Zebras: Complex Mix of Purposes

Why do zebras evolve to sport such black and white, striped coat, has made experts curious. There are many theories that explain the reason behind zebra stripes. One of the theory suggests that these stripes help zebras to camouflage in tall grasses, exceptionally well during dawn or the dusk time. While another one says, the strips assist zebra to escape from the bites of troublesome flies or social cohesion. While the last one advocates that, these stripes create an optical illusion, which dazzles the hunter that eventually misses its target. 

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Pitcher Plants switch off their Traps for luring more Prey: Exploiting Insects social instincts

Carnivorous vegetation like pitcher plants has adapted to thrive in areas scarce of nutrients. Unlike other plants that derive nutrients from soil, pitcher plants have evolved to derive essential nutrients by gorging on insects trapped in their pitcher like traps. Experts from the University of Cambridge, UK and the University of Bristol, UK, studying the pitcher plants say that the plants are smart enough to plan a strategy to attract more prey into their deadly traps. 

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Geologic processes in Earth’s Interior responsible for creating Oceans: Geoscientific Mystery

Emergence of water is the best part in the origin of life on the planet Earth. Without water, Earth might not have looked like what it is today, but the question how water first appeared on our Blue Planet is still a mystery. The most popular theory suggests that the collision of enormous icy comets with dry and inhospitable Earth, resulted in deposition of water on the surface. 

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Cat-Sized Dinosaur Fossil Discovered in Montana: Aquilops americanus

Dr Andrew Farke a paleontologist and his team from Raymond have surfaced a new species of dinosaurs that were herbivorous and beaked belonging to the family of Ceratopsia or Ceratopia. These genus dinosaurs occupied North America, Europe, and Asia, during the Cretaceous Period, nearly 108 million years ago. American eagle face Due to its looks, it’s also called the Aquilops americanus that stands for American eagle face. Unlike Triceratops, also the herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaurs that were expected around late Cretaceous period, its famous relatives, it did not have horns neither…

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